Minstrel Warrior
When I first built The Mule, I couldn’t shoot black and white instant film because the Copal shutter wasn’t fast enough.  It was originally used on copy stands with perfect lighting and no movement.  Color instant film was also being overexposed.  My solution:  Take a 4-stop neutral density filter from a Polaroid 110a/b and mount it behind the rear lens element.  It’s sandwiched between the front and rear lens boards.  So, when you look at the shutter settings, f/5.6 is actually f/22.  There’s no built in light meter.

When I first built The Mule, I couldn’t shoot black and white instant film because the Copal shutter wasn’t fast enough. It was originally used on copy stands with perfect lighting and no movement. Color instant film was also being overexposed. My solution: Take a 4-stop neutral density filter from a Polaroid 110a/b and mount it behind the rear lens element. It’s sandwiched between the front and rear lens boards. So, when you look at the shutter settings, f/5.6 is actually f/22. There’s no built in light meter.

Same subjects.  Different cameras and instant film.

Same subjects. Different cameras and instant film.

Impossible Project’s new film has improved a lot, especially with color.  But, it still needs faster developing time.  On the bottom row, the first two images were taken at normal exposure at 9:30 AM, before an outdoor musical performance.  The whole top row was taken at 10:00 AM, during the performance.  The sun had risen higher in the sky.  But without being able to see a fully developed image, I didn’t have a reference for adjusting the exposure level.  It seems the only way I’m going to get better images is to waste a lot of film ($$$) and build an automatic “guesstimator” in my head.  And, I’m pretty good at “guessing” exposure with Fujifilm FP-100C/3000B on my converted manual Polaroid 250 and I barely waste any peel apart instant film on that contraption.

Impossible Project’s new film has improved a lot, especially with color. But, it still needs faster developing time. On the bottom row, the first two images were taken at normal exposure at 9:30 AM, before an outdoor musical performance. The whole top row was taken at 10:00 AM, during the performance. The sun had risen higher in the sky. But without being able to see a fully developed image, I didn’t have a reference for adjusting the exposure level. It seems the only way I’m going to get better images is to waste a lot of film ($$$) and build an automatic “guesstimator” in my head. And, I’m pretty good at “guessing” exposure with Fujifilm FP-100C/3000B on my converted manual Polaroid 250 and I barely waste any peel apart instant film on that contraption.

Mochi pounding hammers at the 2014 SF Cherry Blossom Festival.

Mochi pounding hammers at the 2014 SF Cherry Blossom Festival.

Taiko drums at the 2014 SF Cherry Blossom Festival.  (02)

Taiko drums at the 2014 SF Cherry Blossom Festival. (02)

Taiko drums at the 2014 SF Cherry Blossom Festival.  (01)

Taiko drums at the 2014 SF Cherry Blossom Festival. (01)